Assignment: Create a new sense using wearables

Storm’s ‘a comin’, Ethel. Mah bum knee’s smartin’ sumpin’ awful.

There is a piece of folk wisdom here in the US that says one can feel it in their bones when the weather is changing. While this lends itself to more than a few caricatures of old codgers sitting on the porch, there is some anecdotal evidence that arthritic joints could be susceptible to the rapid shifts in atmospheric pressure that occurs right before a weather event.

For my assignment, I decided to build a wearable that would codify this otherwise mystical meteorology: a knee brace that uses a barometric pressure sensor to activate a mini vibration motor when the pressure falls below a certain threshold, indicating bad weather.

A vision of the future

Background

This is a good example of a barometer that illustrates how to read it.

Barometers are used to predict the weather by measuring the changes in atmospheric (or barometric) pressure. When the barometric pressure decreases rapidly, that is a good indicator that rainy or stormy weather is on the way. For more info why, see here.

I chose to locate my wearable on the knee because of the pervasiveness of the trope of the old man and his bad knee. As is the case with most tropes, I couldn’t rightly say where it originated. Regardless, the image of an old farmer, sitting on a porch while mumbling some folksy nonsense, is burned into mine––and I would wager many Americans’––imaginations. This is a manifestation of that image.

Materials Used (plus tips!)

Disclaimer: The links above are not endorsed by me or anyone else and are for informational purposes only.

Prototyping

In order to wrap my head around how to organize the circuit on the fabric before starting construction, I made the following circuit prototype using conductive tape in my notebook:

Notice I used gaff tape to layer the power line over the ground lines.

So I initially hooked this up to power via the USB cord to my computer. The only code I was running at that time was the example code given along with the SFE_BMP180 library for the barometric pressure sensor. I wanted to test both the sensor and the actuator sides of the circuit. When powered and running the example code, the following SHOULD happen:

This is what ACTUALLY happened:

RUDE.

So WTF was going on? (Spoiler Alert: I don’t know.)

Code

Troubleshooting

In order to try and figure out what was up with the BMP180 sensor, I did the following:

Construction

March 18, 2019